Addison County LST-31 - History

Addison County LST-31 - History


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Addison County

A county in west central Vermont.

(LST-31: dp. 3,960; 1. 328'; b. 50'; dr. 14'1"; s. 11.6 k.; cpl. 119; a. 6 40mm., 12 20mm., 2 .30-cal. mg.; el. LST-1)

LST-31 was laid down on 2 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., launched on 5 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Mauriee Endres accepted by the Navy an] placed in reduced commission on ;0 July 1943, and sailed to New Orleans where she was placed in full commission on 21 July 1943, Lt. John D. Schneidau, Jr., USNR, in command.

The new tank landing ship got underway on 29 July for Panama City, Fla., where she eondueted a series of beaching exercises. LST-31 returned to New Orleans on 7 August to take on cargo for transportation to the Pacific. After a brief port eall at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the vessel transited the Panama Canal on 24 August and joined the Pacific Fleet. She then eontinued on to San Diego, Calif, where she arrived on 13 September.

After participating in beaching exercises in the San Diego area, the ship stopped at Port Hueneme and at San Franciseo, Calif., to take on cargo. She left the west coast on 15 October bound for Hawaii, reached Pearl Harbor on the 25th, and began unloading. When this task was completed, LST~31 again weigfied anchor on 5 November and shaped a course for the Gilbert Islands. As a member of 5th Amphibious force, the ship was slated to take part in the assault on Makin Island.

LST~31 arrived off Makin on the 20th and began discharging troops and cargo ashore. She remained off that atoll until 3 l December, when she got underway to return to Pearl Harbor. l Shortly after her arrival, the vessel entered the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard for repairs and alterations. While her engines were being overhauled, additional 40-millimeter and 20-millimeter guns were installed. The yard period ended in early January 1944, and the refurbished vessel then took part in training exercises off Maui in preparation for the forthecming invasion of the Marshall Islands.

The tank landing ship left Pearl Harbor on 19 January and set a course for Kwajalein. She anchored off that atoll on 1 February and began discharging her cargo in support of operations in the Marshalls. On 12 February, the ship began embarking troops for the invasion of Eniwetok and, five days later, sortied with LST Group 8. She beached at Eniwetok on the 20th and began landing her soldiers and discharging cargo ashore. LST~31 remained there until 20 March, when she got underway for Hawaii. She stopped en route at Kwajalein and Tarawa to take on cargo and passengers and finally reached Pearl Harbor on 15 April.

Following repairs m drydock there, she resumed operations on 10 May with a series of training exercises in Hapuna Bay, Hawaii. On the 25th, LST-31 left Hawaiian waters, bound for Eniwetok. Upon her arrival at that atoll on 7 June, she refueled and took on cargo in preparation for operations against Saipan. The vessel arrived off Saipan on 14 June and began discharging troops and supplies ashore. She cleared the area on the 23d and returned to Eniwetok to replenish her cargo.

LST~31 arrived back at Saipan on 17 July; unloaded supplies and small craft; and, during the next few weeks, served as a hospital ship. At night, she anchored off Saipan to receive easualties and was underway off Tinian during daylight hours. This assignment occupied the ship through 21 August, when she began a round-trip voyage to Eniwetok. After returning to Saipan the vessel underwent three days of voyage repairs and got underway on 23 September for the west coast of the United States. En route, she touched at Eniwetok; Apamama and Makin Islands Gilbert Islands; and Pearl Harbor. She left the latter port on 6 November and reached San Franciseco, Calif., on 17 November 1944.

After one day in port there, LST-31 sailed to San Pedro to enter the West Coast Shipbuilding Co. yards for extensive alterations and repairs. The ship left the yard in early February 1945 conducted sea trials, and arrived at the Mare Island Navy Yard Vallejo, Calif., on 18 February to take on an amphibious craft. She then visited Seattle, Wash., for additional repair work. On 10 March, the vessel got underway for Hawaii and reached Pearl Harbor on the 23d.

LST~31 left Hawaii on 4 April for Okinawa. She embarked passengers and loaded supplies at Eniwetok and Guam before proceeding on to the Ryukyus and anchoring in waters off southwestern Okinawa on 3 May. She remained in the area for approximately three weeks providing logistic support to troops fighting on Okinawa. The ship arrived at UIithi on 28 May, took on cargo and, on 2 June, set a course for the island of Leyte in the Philippines.

During the months of June, July, and August, LST-31 operated between the Philippines and Okinawa, transporting supplies and troops between the two points to build up Okinawa as a base for the conquest of the Japanese home islands. However this invasion was obviated when Japan capitulated on 15 August. The ship then began moving occupation troops and equipment to Japan from various points in the Philippines. She first arrived in Japanese waters on 15 September, when she dropped anchor in Tokyo Bay.

On 30 November, LST-31 was assigned to duty in Japan with the 5th Fleet, Amphibious Group 11, LST Flotilla 35. However these orders were superseded late in December and the ship was slated for decommissioning. She was scheduled to be turned over to the Japanese merchant marine to be manned by aJapanese crew under American control for use in repatriating Japanese citizens and shuttling supplies between Japanese ports. After the ship was stripped of all armament and other wartime equipment, LST-31 was decommissioned on 8 January 1946 and transferred to the Japanese.

The vessel operated under Japanese control into May 1948. She left Yokohama on the 3d of that month and shared a course for the west coast of the United States. The tank landing ship was later berthed in the Seattle area. On 1 July 1955, LST~31 was named Addison County. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955, and she was subsequently sunk as a target.

Addison County earned five battle stars for her World War II service.


USS LST-31

USS Addison County (LST-31) was an LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Addison County, Vermont, she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

LST-31 was laid down on 2 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by the Dravo Corporation launched on 5 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Maurice Endres accepted by the Navy and placed in reduced commission on 10 July 1943 and sailed to New Orleans where she was placed in full commission on 21 July 1943 with Lieutenant John D. Schneidau, Jr., USNR, in command.


Addison County LST-31 - History

LST-30 was laid down on 12 January 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 3 May 1943 sponsored by Mrs. C. B. Jansen and commissioned on 3 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-30 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operation:

Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-30 was decommissioned on 6 March 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 8 May 1946. On 2 April 1947, she was sold to W. Horace Williams Co., of New Orleans, La., and was converted for merchant service.

LST-30 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-81 was laid down on 2 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 5 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Maurice Endres and commissioned on 21 July 1943.

During World War 11, LST-31 served in the AsiaticPacific theater and took part in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

(b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June through August 1944

Tinian capture and occupation-July and August 1944

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May 1945

Immediately following the war, LST-31 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 8 January 1946. On 1 July 1955, LST-31 was named Addison County after a county in Vermont. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955, and she was sunk as a target.

Addison County earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-31.

LST-32 was laid down on 17 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 22 May 1943 sponsored by Miss Dorothy M. Manko and commissioned on 12 July 1943, Lt. Gardner P. Mulloy in command.

During World War 11, LST-32 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Invasion of southern France-August and September 1944

LST-32 was decommissioned in July 1946. She was recommissioned on 7 March 1951. On 1 July 1955 , LST

82 was assigned the name Alameda County after a county in California. She was reclassified Alameda County (AVB-1) on 28 August 1957, was decommissioned on 25 June 1962, and was struck from the Navy list that same month. On 20 November 1962, she was transferred to the Italian Navy.

Alameda County earned two battle stars for World War II service as LST-32.

LST-33 was laid down on 23 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 21 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Paul J. Walsh commis

sioned on 4 August 1943 and transferred to the Greek Navy on 18 August 1943, with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Samos (L- 179). She was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-34 was laid down on 15 March 1943 at Pittsburgh,, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 15 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Verne C. Cobb and commissioned on 26 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-34 served in the AsiaticPacific theater and took part in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

(b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June 1944

Leyte landings-October and November 1944

Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - May 1945

Following the war, LST-34 performed occupation duty in the Far East from March to November 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 15 November 1946 and transferred to Military Government, Ryukyus. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 December 1947. She ran aground in the Far East in January 1949, and her hulk was abandoned.

LST-34 earned six battle stars for World War 11 serviee.

LST-35 was laid down on 20 March 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 30 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Samuel G. Cooper and transferred to the government of Greece on 18 August 1943 with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Chios (L-195). Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-36 was laid down on 21 April 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 10 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Franklin Keen and transferred to the government of Greece on 23 August 1943 with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Lemnos (L-158). Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-37 was laid down on 1 April 1943 at Pittsbu rgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 5 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Jack Domb and transferred to the government of Greece on 18 August 1943. She ran aground off Bizerte, Tunisia, on 1 June 1944, and sank. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 12 August 1948.

LST-38 was laid down on 14 April 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 27 July 19.43 sponsored by Miss Bertha Karpinski and commissioned on 3 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-38 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1,944

Bismarck Archipelago operation,

(a) Admiralty Islands landings March and April 1944

Hollandia operation-April 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Following the war, LST-38 was redesignated LSTH38 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to the Ships and Power Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., and subsequently scrapped.

LSTH-38 earned four battle stars for World War II service as LST-38.

LST-39 was laid down on 23 April 1943 by the Dravo Corp. at Pittsburgh, Pa. launched on 29 July 1943 .sponsored by Mrs. L. A. Mertz and commissioned on 8 September 1943. She was assigned to the Pacific area during World War II but saw no combat action. She sank in the summer of 1944, and she was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. She was later refloated, converted to a spare parts issue barge, and redesignated YF-1079. She served the Navy in that capacity until sometime between July 1945 and January 1946, by which time YF-1079 disappeared from the Navy list.


Awards [ edit | edit source ]

During World War II, LST-31 served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and participated in the Gilbert Islands operation (November and December 1943) the Marshall Islands operation, (a) occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls (January and February 1944), and (b) occupation of Eniwetok Atoll (February and March 1944) Marianas operation, (a) capture and occupation of Saipan (June to August 1944) Tinian capture and occupation (July and August 1944) and Okinawa Gunto operation, assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto (May 1945). Addison County earned five battle stars for her World War II service.


  • Town of Hancock from Vermont Historical Gazetteer.
  • Hancock Town Clerk:
    Mail: P.O. Box 100
    Physical: 48 VT Route 125 Hancock, VT 05748
    P: 802-767-3660
    F: 802-767-4370
    E: [email protected]
  • Town of Leicester from Vermont Historical Gazetteer. (official site)
  • Leicester Historical Society – meets at the Leicester Town Hall
  • Leicester Town Clerk:
    44 Schoolhouse Rd. Leicester, VT 05733
    P: 802-247-5961 x3
    F: 802-247-6501
    E: [email protected]

Addison County LST-31 - History

From the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships , Vol. VII (1981), pp. 569-731.

LST-1 was laid down on 20 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 7 September 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Laurence T. Haugen, and commissioned on 14 December 1942, Lt. W. L. Chessman in command.

During World War I, LST-1 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • Anzio-Nettuno phase of operations on west coast of Italy-January to March 1944
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-1 was decommissioned on 21 May 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to the Ships Power and Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.

LST-1 earned four battle stars for World War Il service.

LST-2 was laid down on 23 June 1942 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 19 September 1942 sponsored by Miss Nancy Jane Hughes and commissioned on 9 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-2 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • North African occupation-early 1943
  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-2 was decommissioned on 11 April 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-2 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-3 was laid down on 29 June 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 19 September 1942, sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Harlow, and commissioned on 8 February 1943

During World War II, LST-S was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July to August 1943
  • Invasion of southern France-August to September 1944

LST-3 was decommissioned sometime after World War II ended and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 10 September 1947, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping.

LST-3 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-4 was laid down on 4 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 9 October 1942 sponsored by Mrs. J. Bartolo and commissioned on
14 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-4 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • West coast of Italy operations-Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings January and February 1944
  • Invasion of southern France-August and September 1944

LST-4 was decomissioned sometime after World War II ended and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 10 September 1947, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping.

LST-4 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-5 was laid down on 12 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 3 October 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Wanetta Rose Barker, and commissioned on 22 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-5 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-5 was decommissioned sometime after World War II ended and was struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947. On 7 October 1947, she was sold to the Tung Hwa Trading Co., of Singapore, for scrapping.

LST-5 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-6 was laid down on 20 July 1942 at Wilmington, Del., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 21 October 1942 sponsored by Mrs. H. E. Haven, and commissioned on 30 January 1943

During World War II, LST-6 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

On 17 November 1944, she was mined and sunk in six fathoms of water while en route from Rouen, France, to Portland, England. She was struck from the Navy list on 22 December 1944.

LST-6 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-7 was laid down on 17 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 31 October 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Anna Marvin, and commissioned on 2 March 1943.

During World War II, LST-7 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Sicilian occupation-July 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-7 was decommissioned on 21 May 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 7 October 1947, she was sold to Mr. L. Lewis Green, Jr. of Charleston, S.C., for scrapping.

LST-7 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-8 was laid down on 26 July 1942 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 29 Oetober 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Anne H. Johnston, and transferred to the United Kingdom on 22 March 1943.

LST-8 was returned from the United Kingdom on 1 June 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-9 was laid down on 9 August 1942 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 14 November 1942 sponsored by Miss Katherine Moxin, and transferred to the United Kingdom on 19 March 1943. LST-9 was returned to the United States Navy on 1 June 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. On 5 September 1948, she was sold to Bosey Philippines.

LST-10

LST-10 was redesignated ARL-1 and named Achelous (q.v.) on 13 January 1943.

LST-11

LST-11 was laid down on 8 August 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 18 November 1942, sponsored by Miss Virginia Fowler, and transferred to the United Kingdom on 22 March 1943

LST-11 was returned to the United States Navy on 13 May 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-12

LST-12 was laid down on 16 August 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 7 December 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Joseph Fay and transferred to the United Kingdom on 25 March 1943.

LST-12 was returned to the United States Navy on 5 January 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 20 March 1946. On 11 September 1947, she was sold to Washburn Wire Co., Philipsdale, R.I., for scrapping.

LST-13

LST-13 was laid down on 1 September 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa.. bv the Dravo Corp. launched on l January 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Jean A. Brackmann and transferred to the United Kingdom on 3 April 1943.

LST-13 was returned to the United States Navy on 27 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 14 October 1947, she was sold to Luria Brothers and Co., Inc., of Philadelphia, Pa., for scrapping.

LST-14

LST-14 was redesignated AGP-5 and named Varuna (q.v.) on 25 January 1943.

LST-15

LST-15 was redesignated ARB-3 and named Phaon (q.v.) on 25 January 1943.

LST-16

LST-16 was laid down on 1 September 1942 at Wilmington, Del., by the Dravo Corp., launched on 19 December 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Lois M. Alexander and commissioned on 17 March 1943.

During World War II, LST-16 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

  • North African occupation:
    (a) Tunisian operations July 1943
  • Sicilian occupation-September 1943
  • Salerno landings-September 1943
  • West coast of Italy operations:
    (a) Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January and February 1944
  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

Following the war, LST-16 performed occupation duty in the Far East in September and November 1945. She was decommissioned on 8 March 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Ships and Power Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.

LST-16 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-17

LST-17 was laid down on 21 September 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 8 January 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Sarah H. Bankson and commissioned on 19 April 1943, Lt. H. B. Gallagher, USCGR, in command.

During World War II, LST-17 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operation:

Following the war, LST-17 performed occupation duty in the Far East intermittently from September through December 1945. She was decommissioned on 15 January 1946. On 15 November 1954, she was transferred to Commandant 13th Naval District, for use as a mobile target, and was sunk on 15 August 1956 by torpedo fire.

LST-17 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-18

LST-18 was laid down on 1 October 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 15 February 1943, sponsored by Miss Ruth Watt, and commissioned on 26 April 1943.

During World War II, LST-18 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Finschhafen occupation phase of the Eastern New Guinea operation-September 1943
  • Bismarck Archipelago operation:
    (a) Cape Gloucester landings on New Britain -December 1943 and January 1944
    (b) Admiralty Islands landings-March and April 1944
  • Hollandia operation-April and May 1944
  • Western New Guinea operations:
    (a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area-May 1944
    (b) Biak Island-June 1944
    (c) Noemfoor Island-July 1944
    (d) Cape Sansapor-July and August 1944
    (e) Morotai landings-September 1944
  • Leyte landings-October and November 1944
  • Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945
  • Consolidation of the southern Philippines
    (a) Palawan Island landings-March 1945
    (b) Visayan Islands landings-March and April 1945

Following the war, LST-18 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 3 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946 and was sold to the Suwannee Fruit & Steamship Co., of Jacksonville, Fla., on 31 October 1946 for conversion to merchant service

LST-18 earned seven battle stars for World War II service.

LST-19

LST-I9 was laid down on 22 October 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 11 March 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Frances P. Gott, commissioned on 15 May 1943 and redesignated LSTH on 15 September 1945.

During World War II, LST-19 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944
  • Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944
  • Western Caroline Islands operations:
    (a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944

Following the war, LST-I9 performed occupation duty in the Far East in October and December 1945 She was decommissioned on 20 March 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Ships and Power Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.

LST-19 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-20

LST-20 was laid down on 5 October 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 15 February 1943 sponsored by Miss Anne B. Sylvester, and commissioned on 14 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-20 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Leyte landings-October 1944
  • Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April 1945

Following the war, LST-20 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 3 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946 and was transferred to the Maritime Administration on 8 October 1947 for disposal by scrapping.

LST-20 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-21

LST-21 was laid down on 25 September 1942 at Wilmington, Del., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 18 February 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Lillian M. Lloyd and commissioned on 14 April 1943.

The tank landing ship was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion in June 1944.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 25 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. She was sold to Louis Feldman, of Flushing, N.Y., on 12 March 1948 and was subsequently scrapped.

LST-21 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-22

LST-22 was laid down on 5 November 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 29 March 1943 sponsored by Mrs. W. A. Barnes, and commissioned on 29 May 1943, Lt. L. N. Ditlefsen, USCG, in command.

During World War II, LST-22 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Eastern New Guinea operation:
    (a)Saidor occupation-January and February 1944
  • Bismarck Archipelago operation:
    (a) Cape Gloucester, New Britain-December 1943, January and February 1944
    (b) Admiralty Islands landings-March and April 1944
  • Hollandia operation-April and May 1944
  • Western New Guinea operations:
    (a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area operation-May 1944
    (b) Biak Island operation-May and June 1944
    (c)Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944
    (d) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944
    (e)Morotai landings-September 1944
  • Leyte landings-October and November 1944
  • Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945

LST-22 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 1 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946 and was sold to MingSung Industrial Co., Ltd., of Shanghai, China, on 3 February 1947 to be converted for merchant service.

LST-22 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST-23

LST-23 was laid down on 27 October 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 13 March 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Mary H. Miller and commissioned on 22 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-23 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-February 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (b) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944
  • Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944
  • Western Caroline Islands operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944
  • Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945

On 15 September 1945, she was redesignated LSTH. Immediately after the war, LSTH-23 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 24 May 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946 and was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc. Seattle, Wash., on 6 April 1948 for scrapping.

LSTH-23 earned six battle stars for World War II service as LST-23.

LST-24

LST-24 was laid down on 19 November 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 17 April 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Marguerite E. Davis and commissioned on 14 June 1943

During World War II, LST-24 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Guam- August 1944
  • Western New Guinea operation:
    (a) Morotai landings-September 1944
  • Leyte landings-October and November 1944
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - March and June 1945

LST-24 was decommissioned on 26 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946 On 23 December 1947, she was sold to the Humble Oil & Refining Co., of Houston, Tex., and was converted for merchant service.

LST-24 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-25

LST-25 was laid down on 12 October 1942 at Wilmington, Del., by the Dravo Corp, launched on 9 March 1943 sponsored by Miss Doily Hemphill, and commissioned on 3 May 1943, Lt. J. B. Holmes, USCG in command.

During World War II, LST-25 served in the European and Asiatic-Pacific theaters and participated in the following operations:

  • Invasion of Normandy-June 1944
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May 1945
  • Navy Occupation Service, Asia-September and October 1945 and March 1946
  • China Service-October 1945 and March 1946

LST-25 was decommissioned on 2 August 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 8 October 1946. On 31 March 1948, she was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc. Seattle, Wash., for scrapping.

LST-25 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-26

LST-26 was laid down on 16 November 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 31 March 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Mathilda B. Coulter and commissioned on 7 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-26 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Bismarck Archipelago operation:
    (a) Cape Gloucester, New Britain-December 1943 and January 1944
  • Hollandia operation-April and May 1944
  • Western New Guinea operations:
    (a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area operation-May 1944
    (b) Biak Island operation-May and June 1944
    (c) Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944
    (d) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944
    (e) Morotai landings-September 1944
  • Leyte landings-October and November 1944
  • Consolidation of the southern Philippines:
    (a) Mindanao Island landings-March 1945

She saw service in China from 3 to 10 October 1945.

Following the war, LST-26 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 1 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 8 May 1946 and was sold to Arctic Circle Exploration, Seattle, Wash., on 17 June 1946 to be converted for merchant service.

LST-26 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-27

LST-27 was laid down on 10 December 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 27 April 1943 sponsored by Mrs. R. R. Creed and commissioned on 25 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-27 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

LST-27 was decommissioned on 9 November 1945 and was struck from the Navy list on 28 November 1945. On 15 December 1947, she was sold to the Rhode Island Navigation Co., of Newport, R.I., for scrapping.

LST-27 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-28

LST-28 was laid down on 8 December 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 19 April 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Michael Torick and commissioned on 19 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-28 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

LST-28 was decommissioned on 16 August 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 29 October 1946. On 19 May 1948, she was sold to George H. Nutman, of Brooklyn, N.Y., for scrapping.

LST-28 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-29

LST-29 was laid down on 8 January 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 17 May 1943, sponsored by Mrs. C. F. Lockton and commissioned on 10 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-29 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
    (b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July and August 1944
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May 1945

LST-29 was decommissioned on 11 March 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 8 May 1946. On 17 June 1946, she was sold to the Foss Launch & Tug Co., of Seattle, Wash.

LST-29 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-30

LST-30 was laid down on 12 January 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 3 May 1943, sponsored by Mrs. C. B. Jansen and commissioned on 3 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-30 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operation:

LST-30 was decommissioned on 6 March 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 8 May 1946. On 2 April 1947, she was sold to W. Horace Williams Co., of New Orleans, La., and was converted for merchant service.

LST-30 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-31

LST-31 was laid down on 2 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 5 June 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Maurice Endres and commissioned on 21 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-31 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajulein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
    (b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June through August 1944
  • Tinian capture and occupation-July and August 1944
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May 1945

Immediately following the war, LST-31 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 8 January 1946. On 1 July 1955 LST-31 was named Addison County after a county in Vermont. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955, and she was sunk as a target.

Addison County earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-31.

LST-32

LST-32 was laid down on 17 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 22 May 1943, sponsored by Miss Dorothy M. Manko, and commissioned on 12 July 1943, Lt. Gardner P. Mulloy in command.

During World War II, LST-32 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

LST-32 was decommissioned in July 1946. She was recommissioned on 7 March 1951. On 1 July 1955, LST-32 was assigned the name Alameda County after a county in California. She was reclassified Alameda County (AVB-1) on 28 August 1957, was decommissioned on 25 June 1962, and was struck from the Navy list that same month. On 20 November 1962, she was transferred to the Italian Navy

Alameda County earned two battle stars for World War II service as LST-32.

LST-33

LST-33 was laid down on 23 February 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. Launched on 21 June 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Paul J. Walsh, commissioned on 4 August 1943, and transferred to the Greek Navy on 18 August 1943, with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Samos (L-179). She was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-34

LST-34 was laid down on 15 March 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., launched on 15 June 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Verne C. Cobb, and commissioned on 26 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-34 served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943
  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
    (b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June 1944
  • Leyte landings-October and November 1944
  • Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945
  • Okinawa Gunto operation
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - May 1945

Following the war, LST-34 performed occupation duty in the Far East from March to November 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 15 November 1946 and transferred to Military Government, Ryukyus. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 December 1947. She ran aground in the Far East in January 1949, and her hulk was abandoned.

LST-34 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST-35

LST-35 was laid down on 20 March 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 30 June 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Samuel G. Cooper and transferred to the government of Greece on 18 August 1943 with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Chios (L 195). Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-36

LST-36 was laid down on 21 April 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 10 July 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Franklin Keen, and transferred to the government of Greece on 23 August 1943 with which she served through the remainder of World War II. She was sold to the government of Greece in January 1947 and served there as Lemnos (L-158). Her name was struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947.

LST-37

LST-S7 was laid down on 1 April 1943 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 5 July 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Jack Domb, and transferred to the government of Greece on 18 August 1943. She ran aground off Bizerte, Tunisia, on 1 June 1944, and sank. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 12 August 1948.

LST-38

LST-38 was laid down on 14 April 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 27 July 1943 sponsored by Miss Bertha Karpinski and commissioned on 3 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-38 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Marshall Islands operation
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
  • Bismarck Archipelago operation:
    (a) Admiralty Islands landings-March and April 1944
  • Hollandia operation-April 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Following the war, LST-38 was redesignated LSTH-38 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to the Ships and Power Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., and subsequently scrapped.

LSTH-38 earned four battle stars for World War II service as LST-38.

LST-39

LST-39 was laid down on 23 April 1943 by the Dravo Corp. at Pittsburgh, Pa., Iaunched on 29 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. L. A. Mertz, and commissioned on 8 September 1943. She was assigned to the Pacific area during World War II but saw no combat action. She sank in the summer of 1944, and she was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. She was later refloated, converted to a spare parts issue barge, and redesignated YF-1079. She served the Navy in that capacity until sometime between July 1945 and January 1946, by which time YF-1079 disappeared from the Navy list.

LST-40

LST-40 was laid down on 3 June 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., launched on 7 August 1943 sponsored by Miss Hilda Sambolt, and commissioned on 15 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-40 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Consolidation of the Solomon Islands:
    (a) Consolidation of southern Solomons- June 1943
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and August 1944
  • Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944
  • Okinawa Gunto operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May 1945

Following the war, LST-40 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 18 February 1946. In February 1947, she was transferred to the United States Military Government Korea, as a sale, and was struck from the Navy list on 5 March that same year.

LST-40 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-41

LST-41 was laid down on 24 May 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 17 August 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Mary Spisak and commissioned on 24 September 1943, Lt. W. B. Dundon, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-41 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
  • Hollandia operation-April 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944
  • Western Caroline Islands operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944
  • Luzon operation:
    (a) Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945

Following the war, LST-41 was redesignated LSTH-41 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until late November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 25 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 8 October 1947, she was sold to J. C. Berkwit & Co., of New York City, N.Y.

LSTH-41 earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-41.

LST-42

LST-42 was laid down on 17 June 1943 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 17 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. F. M. Leslie, and commissioned on 30 September 1943, Lt. Roy L. Guy in command.

During World War II, LST-42 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
    (b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944
  • Tinian capture and occupation July 1944
  • Western Caroline Islands operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944
  • Iwo Jima operation:
    (a) Assault and occupation of Iwo Jima- February and March 1945

Following the war, LST-42 was redesignated LSTH-42 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until early April 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946. On 26 March 1948 she was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LSTH-42 earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-42.

LST-43

LST-43 was laid down on 19 June 1943 at Philadelphla, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 28 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. C. A. Hill and commissioned on 6 October 1943. She was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater during World War II and participated In the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls from 31 January to 8 February 1944. On 21 May 1944, she was lost through an accident. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. She was raised but deemed beyond economical repair and was subsequently sunk by torpedoes in 1945.

LST-43 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-44

LST-44 was laid down on 7 July 1943 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 11 September 1943 sponsored by Mrs. F. E. Haeberle, and commissioned on 22 October 1943.

During World War II, LST-44 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion from 6 to 25 June 1944. Following the war she performed occupation duty in the Far East anl sernce in China until mid-February 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 20 February 1946. In 1947, she was transferred to the United States Army and was destroyed on 23 July 1947, cannibalized and scrapped. On 28 August 1947, her name was struck from the Navy list.

LST-44 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-45

LST-45 was laid down on 27 June 1943 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 31 August 1943 sponsored by Miss Lois C. Donnelly and commissioned on 15 October 1943.

During World War II, LST-45 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

  • Marshall Islands operation:
    (a) Occupation of Kwajelein and Majuro Atolls-January and February 1944
  • Marianas operation:
    (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June through August 1944
    (b) Tinian capture and occupation-July and August 1944
  • Okinawa assault-March through June 1945

Following the war, LST-45 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late October 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 30 November 1948 and struck from the Navy list on 22 December that same year. On 25 February 1949, she was sold to the Foss Launch & Tug Co., of Seattle, Wash.

LST-45 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-46

LST-46 was laid down on 20 July 1943 at Pittsburgh Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 16 September 1943, sponsored by Mrs. J. J. Edson, Jr. and commissioned on 3 November 1943.

During World War II, she was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion from 6 to 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater where she took part in the Okinawa assault in June 1945. Following the war, LST-46 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until midMay 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 6 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 13 February 1948, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines, and resold to T. Y. Fong on the same date.

LST-46 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-47

LST-47 was laid down on 30 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 24 September 1943 sponsored by by Mrs. Clarence H. Vant, and commissioned on 8 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 26 and 30 June 1945. Following the war, LST-47 performed occupation duty in the Far East in the fall and winter of 1945 and early January 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 11 January 1946 and transferred to the United States Army the same day. She was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service on 31 March 1952 and redesignated USNS LST-47. USNS LST-47 was transferred to the Philippine Navy on 13 September 1976.

LST-47 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-48

LST-48 was laid down on 8 August 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 2 October 1942 sponsored by Mrs. A. E. Stacey and commissioned on 16 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion between 6 and 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France between 15 August and 25 September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 30 May and 10 June 1945. Following the war, LST-48 performed occupation duty in the Far East during the winter of 1945 and 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 8 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 December 1947. On 27 May 1948 she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethiehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-48 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-49

LST-49 was laid down on 17 August 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 9 October 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Kathryn Saban and commissioned on 20 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion between 6 and 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France between 15 August and 25 September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 8 and 30 June 1945. Following the war, LST-49 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until mid-March 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 11 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. She was sold to Bosey Philippines, on 4 December 1947.

LST-49 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-50

LST-50 was laid down on 29 August 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Iaunched on 16 October 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Tito Tarquinio and commissioned on 27 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion between 6 and 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France between 15 August and 25 September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 18 and 30 June 1945. Following the war, LST-50 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 6 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 8 September 1952. On 14 November 1952, she was redesignated ARB-13 and transferred to Norway as Ellida (A-534). She was returned to the United States on 1 July 1960 but was retransferred to Greece on 16 September 1960, and served with the Greek Navy as Sakipia (A-329).


Welcome to Addison County Vermont History and Genealogy

Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers.

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Past Updates Recent Updates
December 2020
Biography: Bennett S. Brown

September 2020
Death Notice: Mrs. Harriot Eliza Hawley, Elijah Tyler
News-Fires: Patrick Burgin's Barn Destroyed by Fire

1790 Addison Twp Federal Census - Sorted by Head of Household - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

1790 Federal Census - Entire Census - Transcribed by Linda Natale HISTORY

Swift's 1859 History Chapter II: County Seats, County Buildings, Courts, Changes of the Judiciary MILITARY

Addison County Military Casualties (WWII Army, Vietnam and Korean war casualties) - Contributed by Tammy Clark


Addison County, Vermont

Addison County is a county located in the state of Vermont. Based on the 2010 census, the population was 36,821. Its shire town is Middlebury.

Etymology - Origin of Addison County Name

The History of Addison County by H.P. Smith, 1886, D. Mason and Co. states that Addison County ". was named in honor of Joseph Addison, the English author. " The Addison family continues to thrive in England and has written us with the information that Joseph lived from 1672 to 1719 and left these words for us: Happiness is something to do, something to love, something to hope for! Addison is buried in Westminster Abby.

Demographics:

Addison County History

Addison County was organized 18 Oct 1785 from Rutland County.
County Seat: Middlebury

In 1609, the French explorer Samuel de Champlain entered the 136-mile lake that would bear his name. Before the end of 17th century, a small stone fort was built at Chimney Point near what is now West Addison on Lake Champlain. It was the first settlement in Vermont. The fort was occupied by the French and then the British. During the Revolutionary War, Lake Champlain was the scene of bitter battles and those living in the area were captured or driven away. One such event happened in May of 1775 Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys, along with Benedict Arnold rowed across the Lake to captured Fort Ticonderoga from the British.

Iroquois settled in the county before European arrived in 1609. French settlers in Crown Point, New York extended their settlements across Lake Champlain. A few individuals or families came up the lake from Canada and established themselves at Chimney Point in 1730. In 1731, at Cross Point Fort Frederic was erected. In the year 1759, General Amherst occupied Cross Point and British settler's settlers came in. The Battle of Bennington in Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, brought a turning point for the American independence against British.

Finally, in 1783, peace was declared, settlers began to return and new communities were formed. Addison County was established on October 18, 1795 and encompassed most of the lands in northwestern Vermont bounded by Lake Champlain.

This county was established by act of the Legislature October 18, 1785 at the period of Vermont Republic. In 1791, Vermont joined the federal union after the original thirteen colonies. When Vermont was admitted to the Union in 1791, the size of the County was reduced to its present area with a population of about 6,400 settlers.

Geography: Land and Water

As reported by the Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 808 square miles (2,093 km 2 ), of which, 770 square miles (1,995 km 2 ) of it is land and 38 square miles (99 km 2 ) of it (4.72%) is water. The primary stream of the county is Otter Creek, which runs through the county from the south to the north.

Neighboring Counties

Bordering counties are as follows:

  • Chittenden County, Vermont - north
  • Washington County, Vermont - northeast
  • Orange County, Vermont - east
  • Windsor County, Vermont - southeast
  • Rutland County, Vermont - south
  • Washington County, New York - southwest
  • Essex County, New York - west

Education

Addison County has the following high schools:

Vergennes Union High School in Vergennes
Mt. Abe Union High School in Bristol
Middlebury Union High School in Middlebury
Middlebury Union Middle School in Middlebury

Addison County is also home to two institutions of higher learning, Middlebury College and the Community College of Vermont, both located in Middlebury


Bridport Genealogy (in Addison County, VT)

NOTE: Additional records that apply to Bridport are also found through the Addison County and Vermont pages.

Bridport Birth Records

Bridport Cemetery Records

Bridport Census Records

Federal Census of 1940, Bridport, Vermont LDS Genealogy

United States Federal Census, 1790-1940 Family Search

Bridport Church Records

Bridport Death Records

Bridport Immigration Records

Bridport Land Records

Bridport Marriage Records

Bridport Newspapers and Obituaries

Bridport Sun 1901-1915 Newspapers.com

Bridport Probate Records

Vermont, Addison County and District Probate Files, 1845-1915 Family Search

Additions or corrections to this page? We welcome your suggestions through our Contact Us page


Addison

Like the Indians before them, the first white settlers made their homes near rivers and groves of native timber that gave them the fuel and water needed for survival. The first pioneers in what is now Addison Township were Hezekiah Dunklee (also spelled Duncklee) from Hillsborough, New Hampshire, and Mason Smith from Potsdam, New York. They arrived in Chicago September 3, 1833, having traveled by land from Detroit. They left Chicago five days later, and following a northwest trail made the year before by General Winfield Scott’s army through twenty miles of flat, grassy marshland and prairie, they came to a large grove of trees located on the eastern bank of a river, which later became known as Salt Creek. After surveying the land to the west of the river, they returned to the north end of the grove.

On May 25, 1834, Bernhard Joachim Koehler and his family settled east of Dunklee’s Grove on the present site of the River Forest Country Club. On that same day the Friedrich Graues settled south of the grove. These two families were the first of a large German influx during the next few years. Others to follow were the Stuenkels, the Krages, the Roter­munds, the Kruses, the Fienes, and the Buchholzes.

Most of the necessities of life were produced on the farms, but often the pioneers had to travel to Chicago to buy other provisions. With no roads through the prairie, travel was difficult. Many walked the eighteen miles to Chicago.The Des Plaines River flooded after heavy rains, and at those times such travel was impossible. Wells were dug by hand, often to a depth of thirty or forty feet, and a windmill was built to pump the water. If there was not enough wind, pumping was done by hand.

In 1839 Dunklee’s Grove became part of Washington Precinct. When township organization was adopted in 1849, Washington Precinct became known as Addison Township.

From the 1874 Atlas & History of DuPage County, Illinois.

After the first pioneers settled, other friends and relatives came to claim lands. In 1837 there were thirty families living in the Dunklee’s Grove area. By 1844 there were 200 people living in the vicinity. Gradually businesses were established, such as a steam grist mill, a general store, a cobbler’s shop and a blacksmith shop. In 1867 the Heidemann Mill was constructed in Addison to serve the residents who had been taking their grain to surrounding communities to be ground.

By 1853 state laws enabled school districts to be formed, and District 4 came into being with the building of its first public school in 1858. Peter Nikel was the teacher. The building was located on the southwest corner of Addison and Army Trail roads. Today it is part of the Edward Green home. The German population of Addison Township formed a church in 1838 which was called the German United Reformed Lutheran Congregation of Dunklee’s Grove. In 1849 the first church school building was erected in Addison, near the corner of Army Trail Road and May Street.

In 1864 the Evangelical Lutheran Teachers’ Seminary was built in Addison to train teachers for the Lutheran school system. Their lecture hall, which opened in 1885, included a chapel, and it was here that the residents of Addison worshipped from 1893-1906. In 1906 the Lutheran congregation built the St. Paul Church along Army Trail Road near Lake Street.

In 1874 the Evangelical Lutheran Orphan Home was built to “raise, train, and educate orphans, half orphans and other children entrusted to its care.” All children from the Orphan Home who were of school age went to St. Paul’s Christian Day School. After graduation from the eighth grade, the girls would remain in the Home for work and future training. The boys were placed on farms, truck farms or in greenhouses to work.

In 1884 the village of Addison became incorporated. The population at the time was 400. The first president was Henry Buchholz, who served in that position from 1884 to 1891. In 1890 five Addison men formed the Addison Railroad Company, Inc. These were William Leeseberg, Louis Stuenkel, Edward Rotermund, Professor Johann Backhaus, and H. Z. Zuttermeister. Stock capital amounted to $5,000. A charter was issued on July 16, 1890, for the right to a stretch of land from today’s North Avenue into Addison to build a railroad track. In agreement was made with the Illinois Central Railroad officials to provide the railroad bed and equipment and to maintain and operate the railroad for fifty years from that date. The cost of the whole right-of-way was $16,488.90. The first train came to Addison for the Orphan Home Picnic on September 12, 1890.

Illinois Central Train in Addison on “Orphan Home Festival Day.” Courtesy Historical Museum of Addison.

Telephone service became available in 1895. Addison’s first bank, the Addison State Bank, opened in 1902. In 1912 the Public Service Company of Northern Illinois brought in light and power lines. Electric street lights burned in Addison for the first time on February 1 That same year the Western United Gas and Electric Company brought gas lines into the area.

In 1913 the Lutheran Teachers’ Seminary moved out of Addison to River Forest, where it is now known as Concordia College. The Seminary had been a vital part of Addison’s history for almost fifty years. The Seminary buildings were purchased by the Chicago City Mission Society as a home for dependent children who had had little opportunity for moral, mental or physical development. The children, who were referred by the juvenile courts, were moved from Chicago to Addison in 1916. This became known as the Addison Manual Training School for Boys and the Industrial School for Girls, known generally as the Kinderheim.

Illustrations by Vivian Krentz. Graphics by Ron Carringi.

Street improvements began in the late 19th century. During the 1920s roadways were improved and the automobile made its appearance. The former muddy roads and dusty trails gave way to gravel and concrete roads, and the population patterns began changing. With better routes and the railroad, people were building their homes along the roads.

Two lanes of Lake Street were paved in 1922. A narrow gauge railroad was built along Lake Street to the quarry in Elmhurst to bring gravel and cement to the site. When the roadwork was completed, these tracks were removed. Because of the desire to thoroughly modernize the town, a water system was installed in 1924.

Also, by 1924 the Kinderheim had outgrown the structures which had housed the Seminary, and the building was torn down to make room for a new two-story brick building to house the young people of Kinderheim. This was completed in 1925. Today that structure serves as the municipal building and houses the police department.

Plass Garage. Arthur Krage, George Rathje, George Plass, Warren Web stand before the Ford Agency in 1925. Courtesy Historical Museum of Addison.

Increased traffic along Lake Street prompted the widening of the road in 1930 to forty feet all the way from Cook County line to Ontario­ville, a distance of 12’h miles, and the constructing of a three-span bridge over Salt Creek at Lake Street. Addison was served by the Marigold Bus Line, which came from Chicago every hour on the hour. It followed the same route that had been used in 1837 by the Frink and Walker Line on its way toward Galena, these stage coaches having stopped for a change of horses in Addison.

During the 1930s Addison, as well as the rest of the country, was plunged into the Great Depression. In Addison the bank was forced to close, although in 1933 enough money was raised (between $8,000 and $9,000) to meet legal requirements, and the bank was again able to open for business. The residents of Addison were able to weather the lean years by raising food for their tables, and by taking any job, no matter how small the pay.

The years of World War II brought prosperity once again to the community. Again the men of Addison served proudly in all the services. There were 86 of them in the war. Miraculously, all of them returned safely. Among the Addison residents who had been taken prisoner were Lester Rotermund in Germany, and William Stuenkel in Italy. There were two casualties among those who came from the area outside of Addison: Wilbur Backhaus, who was killed in the Battle of the Bulge and Ernst Ellerbruch who was killed in Sicily.

When World War II ended and the servicemen began returning from overseas, a housing shortage developed. The “G. I. Bill” gave young families the opportunity to purchase homes, and the “baby boom” of the post-war years brought many new residents to Chicago’s suburbs. The population in 1950 was 823. By 1963 it had reached 13,272. Generating a marked increase in village revenue, this growth affected the construction industry and also created additional demands for village services. Schools were soon unable to accommodate the large number of young children, and population projections indicated a need for future expansion of the school system.

School District 4 constructed a building in a second location in 1957, and in that same year St. Joseph Catholic Parish also opened a grade school. From that date, when Fullerton School was built, until 1972 the number increased to nine public grade schools and one junior high school.

In 1965 a second Catholic grade school, St. Philip the Apostle, was built. In 1966 there were two secondary schools built, Addison Trail High School and Driscoll Catholic High School.

Additional religious facilities were added to serve the increased population. Originally most of the residents had been German Lutherans, and the few Catholic families attended church in Elmhurst. As the number of families increased, so did the diversity of faiths. Between 1954 and 1965 there were seven churches of different denominations built.

The “G. I. Bill” was also used by many of the returning servicemen after World War II. Addison established an industrial park with a railroad line that ran into the area. Highways were being improved, and the short distance from O’Hare Airport was an attraction to many manufacturers who built in the park. These additional plants, in turn, brought more people to Addison to live. Many of the farmers surrounding Addison began to sell their farms as property values rose and their taxes increased accordingly.

Prior to 1950 there were few parks and playgrounds in Addison however, as developers subdivided the land, they were encouraged by village officials to set aside areas in each subdivision to be used as parks. In 1958 the Central Park Committee was formed. This was a volunteer group of homeowners who helped establish and maintain parks. The Addison Recreation Club, another volunteer group, began working with Addison’s youth in the early 1950s. In 1965 Addison voters approved a referendum to establish a park district, which now owns over 200 acres of land at eighteen sites and offers activities for residents of all ages, from tots to senior citizens.

In 1962 a public library was established in the municipal building. In 1968 a new building was constructed along Lake Street at Kennedy Drive to house the Addison Public Library.

The banking industry also grew along with the population. Before 1950 the Addison State Bank was the only bank in Addison. As population and businesses increased, the need for additional financial services brought the opening of six other banks or saving and loan associations to the village.

The building industry that began flourishing after World War II concentrated on single-family homes in Addison. More recently developers have obtained permits to build multiple family homes, apartments, townhouses and condominiums. Decreasing availability of land and rising construction costs have contributed to this trend. Today shopping centers have replaced the earlier “general stores.” Shops and restaurants have opened specializing in ethnic goods for an increasingly diverse population.

Also, the schools, with an increased enrollment of children from families new to this country, have had to include bilingual courses in their curriculum. High technology advances have caused many services and business establishments to turn to computers and new training programs for their personnel. Addison’s special education organization, the Ray Graham Association, its Lutherbrook (successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Orphan Home), its assistance programs through the Community Switchboard, its support for cultural growth through the arts programs are all a part of Addison’s response to varying needs.

To summarize, during the past 150 years Addison has grown from a few hardy settlers planting their crops to a town of 30,000 citizens engaged in a multitude of occupations. The quiet hamlet where everyone knew everyone else has given place to a suburb bustling with activity. Today, as it has been throughout its history, Addison is a caring community.

Pearl Morris and Vivian Krentz are co-authors of AddisonVillage of Friendship, the community’s centennial book.



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